Book Review: “Yoni’s Last Battle: The Rescue at Entebbe, 1976” by Iddo Netanyahu

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

My rating: 3 (of 5) “stars”

I read a hardcover copy of this book, which previously belonged to a friend who cleaned out her library. I’ve now done the same thing, and passed the book on to another friend. The book was published in 2001 by Gefen Publishing House. You can still buy used copies of this book online, e. g., at AbeBooks.

Before I post my “Goodreads” review from March 30, 2023, I want to clarify a few things about my review. It was written during a time of political unrest in Israel, but before the heinous October 7, 2023, attacks by Hamas on Israel. Let there be no doubt about my point of view: I unequivocally support Israel. Hamas are terrorists, not Palestinian freedom fighters.

Book Review:

I actually finished reading this book a few weeks ago (note: before March 2023), but wasn’t sure what I would want to write about in my review. Here it is:

The book tells the story of a 1976 rescue operation by an Israeli elite military unit of more than one hundred hostages, who were held captive by Palestinian and German terrorists at the airport of Entebbe, Uganda. The terrorists hijacked a French airplane, and kept the hostages in an old airport building at Entebbe. The Ugandan army helped the terrorists.

The Israeli rescue operation was daring, and a success, but the Israeli military unit’s commander, Yoni Netanyahu, was killed during the rescue mission. I’m not telling you any spoilers, all that information is printed on the book’s dust jacket.

The book was written by Yoni’s brother Iddo Netanyahu, another brother is the current (in 2023) Israeli prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu.

The writer recounts in detail the preparation for this mission, which – as a reader, and not as a military analyst – I wouldn’t have needed to be told in such detail. I would have preferred more information about Yoni Netanyahu as a person: more childhood stories, more personal information, etc. That’s why I am only giving this book three “stars.”

But….

I pulled this book from my bookshelf – never having read it before, it ended up in my personal library when a friend got rid of it several years ago – when the Israeli people started to protest en masse against the judicial reforms in Israel at the beginning of 2023, which would weaken the country’s democratic structures and put Israel on a path towards dictatorship. The reforms were intitiated by the late Yoni Netanyahu’s brother, Benjamin, and while I was reading this book, I couldn’t help thinking over and over again, “Is this what Yoni died for?”

My personal impression is that, were he alive today, Yoni would be very ashamed of the actions of his brother Benjamin. To give your own life for Israel is heroic, and his death was a tragedy. But for me as a reader, it is mind-blowing that almost 50 years later the dead soldier’s brother is the greatest danger to the democratic state of Israel.

Posted in Book Reviews, Politics | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Yoni’s Last Battle: The Rescue at Entebbe, 1976” by Iddo Netanyahu

Book Review: “Sweet and Bitter Bark: Selected Poems” by Robert Frost

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

My rating: 5 (of 5) “stars”

I love the poetry of Robert Frost, and I love this book.

This book was published by The Nature Company in 1992, you can still buy used copies, e. g. on AbeBooks. The Nature Company was founded in 1972, and purchased by the Discovery Channel in 1996. The book doesn’t have an ISBN.

Much care was put into editing and illustrating this book, as well as the slipcase cover – it’s a joy to hold it, read the poems, and look at the photographs, paintings, and drawings chosen to interpret and highlight the moods and emotions of Frost’s poems.

I bought this book many years ago as a present for my mother, who passed away in 2021. After her death, I inherited her library, and this book connects me to her and a joyful time in my life in the 1990s, when I lived, studied, and worked in Los Angeles. Reading this book evokes all kinds of memories, all good, and I guess that’s partly the reason why I cherish it so much.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Sweet and Bitter Bark: Selected Poems” by Robert Frost

Book Review: “The Walled Garden” by Robin Farrar Maass

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

My rating: 3 (of 5) “stars”

I bought a copy of this book via Amazon UK, which was basically self-published by the author, Robin Farrar Maass. SparkPress is officially listed as the publisher, but authors have to finance the printing of their books themselves. SparkPress offers a few extra services, and the company describes itself as a hybrid publisher.

I originally awarded this book only 2 “stars”, but I’ve since upgraded my rating to 3 “stars.” I do think the author did an excellent job self-publishing and promoting her book, and I don’t only want to rate the story, but the whole “package,” especially if an author self-publishes.

I love the idea of incorporating a real book about the language of flowers into a story, and making that language part of the plot. That’s why I bought this book, and I think that the author succeeds in incorporating the language of flowers into the plot.

However, ….

I guessed the secret at the heart of this story and major plot points well in advance, and that’s a major flaw of this book. I was bored from page one — when I guessed the secret — all through to the end. The writer foreshadows each plot point, but unfortunately not subtly enough, so I could easily guess well in advance what would happen next – and it did.

The story lacks a strong antagonist; there’s a subplot which doesn’t amount to much, and is fairly easily resolved at the end. The “villain” of that subplot is a fairly ridiculous figure, and the subplot isn’t incorporated well into the story; it’s hinted at in the early chapters of the book, but then all but disappears until the final chapters, when it’s put front and center. This story structure didn’t work for me.

The book’s characters aren’t particularly complex figures, they don’t have many layers to them. I wasn’t interested in any of them as people, and they won’t linger in my mind now that I’ve finished reading the book.

There’s one character, Elizabeth Blackspear, a deceased poet and garden designer, whose life and a secret about her life are at the center of this novel. Yet I never quite believed that she supposedly was a famous garden designer or a world-renowned poet – the poetry, writen by the novel’s author – didn’t impress me all that much, and even all the detailed descriptions of the two gardens designed by her didn’t convince me that she supposedly was some sort of female Lancelot “Capability” Brown.

The book’s dialogue is another weakness, it’s on-the-nose: there’s no subtlety to it. Most of the time, the characters basically say what they mean, and mean what they say.

There’s one additional element which ruined the book for me, and that’s the author’s decision to tell her story in present tense. I would’ve preferred it if the story had been told in past tense. The story takes place in 1952, 2009, and 2014 — and it’s all told in present tense. That’s just weird, and I hated it. But of course that’s a personal preference/dislike, other readers might enjoy this particular creative choice.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “The Walled Garden” by Robin Farrar Maass

Book Review: “Orchis” von Verena Stauffer

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 3 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe mir eine Kopie des Buches aus einer Bibliothek ausgeborgt, das Buch wurde im Jahr 2018 vom Verlag Kremayr & Scheriau veröffentlicht.

Mir hat die Geschichte gut gefallen, zumindest bis zu dem Moment, in dem sich die Hauptfigur des Romans, Anselm, auf eine Reise nach China begibt, um eine Orchidee zu suchen. Davor liegt der Fokus ganz stark auf Anselm und seiner Besessenheit mit Orchideen.

Auf der Schiffsreise geht es plötzlich um ganz andere Dinge, und das hat mich ganz herausgerissen aus der Geschichte; den Rest der Erzählung fand ich dann nicht mehr so spannend, da war für mich einfach ein Bruch da, den die Autorin nicht mehr überwinden konnte.

Eine andere Leserin hat in ihrer “Goodreads”-Review die Sätze als “überladen” bezeichnet, und das empfand ich eigentlich auch.

Trotzdem insgesamt ein lesenswertes Buch.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Orchis” von Verena Stauffer

Book Review: “Solange es Frauen gibt, wie sollte da etwas vor die Hunde gehen?” von Djuna Barnes

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 2 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe diese Hardcover-Edition des Buches des Verlags Klaus Wagenbach von einer Freundin geschenkt bekommen.

Dieses im Jahr 1991 veröffentlichte Buch enthält acht in die deutsche Sprache übersetzte Interviews mit Frauen, die zuvor in den folgenden Büchern veröffentlicht wurden: I Could Never Be Lonely without a Husband: Interviews by Djuna Barnes (1987) und New York (1989). Die Interviews stammen aus den ersten drei Jahrzehnten des 20. Jahrhunderts.

Die einzige interviewte Frau, die mir vorab bekannt war, ist Coco Chanel. Von den anderen sieben Frauen hat mich eigentlich nur – als Persönlichkeit – die Gewerkschaftsaktivistin Mary Jones beeindruckt. Die anderen sechs Frauen waren ein Model und fünf Schauspielerinnen, die heute niemand mehr kennt.

Ich mag den Interview- und Schreibstil von Djuna Barnes nicht besonders. Ich hatte nach dem Lesen eigentlich nicht das Gefühl, dass ich jetzt viel über diese Frauen weiss. Aber diese Interviews wurden teilweise vor mehr als 100 Jahren geführt — und ich kann deshalb sowohl die Leistung von Djuna Barnes, als auch diese Leistungen der interviewten Frauen würdigen. Trotzdem: Viel blieb nach dem Lesen nicht in meinem Gedächtnis; das meiste – inklusive die Namen der meisten Frauen – hatte ich rasch wieder vergessen. Deshalb: zwei “Sterne”.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Solange es Frauen gibt, wie sollte da etwas vor die Hunde gehen?” von Djuna Barnes

Book Review: “Die Frau im Mond” von Milena Agus

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 3 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe die im Jahr 2006 veröffentlichte Hardcover-Edition des Verlags Hoffmann und Campe gelesen, die es heute anscheinend nur mehr antiquarisch zu kaufen gibt, z. B. bei zvab.com. Auf der Webseite des Verlags wird das Buch nicht mehr angeführt. Das Buch gehörte ursprünglich einer Freundin, die es an mich weitergeschenkt hat. Auch ich habe es mittlerweile im Freundeskreis verschenkt.

Mit nur 136 Seiten ist dieser Roman ein schnell gelesenes Buch. Ich fand das Buch nicht schlecht, aber auch nicht wirklich gut und würde es nicht weiterempfehlen.
Eine Enkelin erzählt Geschichten aus dem Leben ihrer Familie, im Zentrum steht eine ihrer Großmütter. Die meisten Figuren haben keine Namen und werden nur als Großmutter, Großvater, Mama, Papa, etc. beschrieben. Der (angebliche) Liebhaber der Großmutter, ein Kriegsheimkehrer des Zweiten Weltkrieges, wird als Reduce bezeichnet, was anscheinend das italienische Wort für Heimkehrer ist. “Angeblich” deshalb, weil es sich um einen Roman handelt, und das letzte Kapitel des Buches die Beziehung zwischen der Großmutter und dem Reduce in einem neuen Licht erscheinen läßt, das meiner Meinung nach dem Roman sehr schadet.
All das erzeugt Distanz beim Leser. Ich habe die Geschichten gelesen, ohne eine emotionale Beziehung zu den Figuren aufzubauen.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Die Frau im Mond” von Milena Agus

Book Review: “Maksym” von Dirk Stermann

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 3 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe die im Jahr 2022 vom Rohwolt-Verlag veröffentlichte Hardcover-Kopie gelesen, die ich als Weihnachtsgeschenk bekommen habe. Ich werde das Buch im Freundeskreis weiterschenken.

Mir hat das Buch gefallen, aber eigentlich bin ich kein Fan der Gattung Autofiktion. Früher Thomas Bernhard (“Holzfällen”), jetzt Joachim Mayerhoff, Annie Ernaux und eben auch Dirk Stermann – sie alle schreiben Romane, in die ein paar Personen und Erlebnisse ihres eigenen Lebens eingearbeitet sind, der Großteil der Geschichten aber erfunden ist.

Ich finde das sehr irritierend, und empfinde beim Lesen eine gewisse Orientierungslosigkeit. Ich lese keine Autobiografie, das ist klar. Aber eben auch keinen “echten” Roman.

Mir geht Autofiktion mittlerweile schon sehr auf die Nerven. Ich glaube, das war das letzte Buch dieser Gattung, das ich in absehbarer Zeit lesen werde.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Maksym” von Dirk Stermann

Book Review: “Dunkelblum” von Eva Menasse

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 3 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe die im Jahr 2021 veröffentlichte Hardcover-Edition des Verlags Kiepenheuer & Witsch gelesen, die ursprünglich einer Freundin gehörte, die das Buch an mich weiterschenkte. Ich habe es auch verschenkt, indem ich es in das offene Bücherregal im Q19 Einkaufszentrum in Wien gestellt habe.

Erzählt wird eine Geschichte, die im Jahr 1989 in dem fiktiven Ort Dunkelblum an der burgenländisch-ungarischen Grenze spielt. Ereignisse der letzten Kriegstage des Zweiten Weltkrieges wirken stark nach. Die Geschichte erinnert an das “Massaker von Rechnitz” – ich denke, es ist ganz bewusst eine fiktive Nacherzählung des Massakers, eingebettet in Ereignisse des Jahres 1989.

Ich fand das Buch sehr interessant, aber es gibt so viele Figuren, dass ich jedes Mal, wenn ich nach einer mehrtägigen Pause weiterlas, zurückblättern und mich neu orientieren musste.

Erzählt wird die Geschichte von einem anonymen Erzähler, das schafft Distanz beim Leser. Auch deshalb fiel es mir lange sehr schwer, den Überblick über die Figuren zu behalten. Es gab einfach keine Figur, deren “point of view” mich durch die Geschichte geführt hätte. Und das ist auch der Grund, weshalb ich die Geschichte mit einer inneren emotionalen Distanz gelesen und am Schluss das Buch eher unbefriedigt zur Seite gelegt habe.

Ich werde das Buch verschenken oder in einem offenen Bücherkasten deponieren, damit es von jemand anderem auch noch gelesen werden kann. Ich fand es nicht so toll, dass ich es noch ein zweites Mal lesen würde wollen. Deshalb: drei “Sterne”.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Dunkelblum” von Eva Menasse

Book Review: “Alle, außer mir” von Francesca Melandri

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

Meine Bewertung: 5 (of 5) “stars”

Ich habe eine Hardcover-Edition dieses im Jahr 2018 vom Verlag Klaus Wagenbach veröffentlichten Romans als Weihnachtsgeschenk erhalten.

Mir hat das Buch sehr gut gefallen, obwohl es keine leichte Kost ist: Die Autorin erzählt die Geschichte des Italieners Attilio Profeti und seiner Familie: Eltern, Großeltern, zwei Ehefrauen, fünf Kinder von drei verschiedenen Frauen. Attilio war ein durch und durch korrputer Mensch, er war Faschist, Rassist und trotzdem verliebt in eine Äthiopierin.

Die Familiengeschichte ist eingebettet in – vor allem – die Zeit des Faschismus in Italien und in die Jahre der Kolonialherrschaft Italiens über Äthiopien.

Die Greueltaten der Italiener in Äthiopien während des Abessinienkrieges sind nicht leicht zu lesen, und die Beschreibung der Jahre unter Mussolini ist erschütternd. Die Korruption in Italien während der Regierungszeit von Silvio Berlusconi widerte mich beim Lesen auch sehr an.

Die Geschichte endet im Jahr 2012, mit dem Tod des Attilio Profeti. Die Autorin hat sich für eine nicht-chronologische, elliptische Erzählweise entschieden, sie springt zwischen den Zeiten und Figuren hin und her, was ein bisschen gewöhnungsbedürftig ist, aber gut funktioniert.

Das Buch schildert eine korrupte italienische Gesellschaft, korrupte Regierungen, faschistische und rassistische Menschen und die wirklich widerwärtige Behandlung von Flüchtlingen in der heutigen Zeit. Melandri beschreibt ein Italien, das ich so nicht nicht kannte.

Ich habe das Buch innerhalb von rund zwei Wochen ausgelesen und jeweils nur ein paar Seiten auf einmal gelesen. Ich musste immer wieder Pausen einlegen, um das Gelesene zu verdauen. Aber es ist ein sehr gutes Buch, das Lesen zahlt sich aus, und ich kann es auf jeden Fall empfehlen.

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Alle, außer mir” von Francesca Melandri

Book Review: “Not Buying It. My Year without Shopping” by Judith Levine

Please note: I first published this book review on the “Goodreads”-website in 2023.

My rating: 3 (of 5) “stars”

I bought a paperback edition of this book some 15+ years ago, which was published by Pocket Books, a division of publishing house Simon & Schuster. You can still buy copies from this publisher (different edition, different cover art).

This book was first published in 2006, and it’s a bit outdated; Judith Levine describes a year – 2004 – during which she and her partner tried to make do with less and only buy essential items.

As many other readers who posted reviews on “goodreads.com” pointed out, she and her partner owned three cars, two homes, and they were in the middle of adding a fairly large extension to their house in Vermont. She also accepted invitations and gifts from friends throughout the year, and considered professional haircuts “essential” (they’re really not). She did not buy a gift for her niece’s college graduation but gifted her jewelry which she herself had received from her mother as a gift many years earlier, which I think is a thoughtful and meaningful gift. But she did buy clothes for herself during the trip she took to attend her niece’s graduation. It wasn’t a “year without shopping,” but it was a year during which she shopped less than usual and a year during which she became more aware of her impulse spending habits and managed to curb them considerably.

There’s one passage in which she describes going cross-country skiing and forgetting her skiing wax at home. She makes a big deal of her decision to ask a store clerk whether she can “borrow” some skiing wax. (He gifts it to her.) She writes about this anecdote to illustrate a point: that we (consumers) find it difficult to ask for help, especially from someone who makes a living selling the exact thing you need or want for free. My thoughts on that? You don’t necessarily need to wax your skis in order to ski. Make do without, it’s really not a big deal. It’s a badly chosen anecdote to make a point about a larger issue. She does come across as somewhat entitled, and is whining on a very high level.

Yes, she and her partner were cutting back, and saving money, and she raises many good points about the destructive effects of consumerism, but some of the diary entries – e.g., the one from November 26, where she participated in a “Buy Nothing Day” demonstration – are too preachy, and boring to read.

All in all, I give this book three “stars.”

Posted in Book Reviews | Tagged | Comments Off on Book Review: “Not Buying It. My Year without Shopping” by Judith Levine